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A quick poll about taking the vaccine.

How do you feel about taking a/the Covid vaccine?

  • Completely happy to take it/Have taken it.

  • Would rather wait and see for a while but maybe.

  • Would rather not, but not completely turned off to the idea.

  • Absolutely wouldn’t.

  • Would consider it if it meant that I couldn’t travel abroad/go to various events etc.


Results are only viewable after voting.
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Cowley

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This is just a poll to find out what opinion you have on all of this and the results are confidential so that you can state how you feel with impunity...
I’m neutral in all of this but I’m interested in seeing what your opinions are.
Feel free to think of more options if I’ve missed any and I’ll add them later.
Just to add - I wouldn’t be surprised if the answers were completely different in 1/2/5/10 years time, but let’s take this on how we’re all feeling about things right now.
Over to you. :)
 
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Yew

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No safety concerns whatsoever, though I'd prefer to make sure that vulnerable people are vaccinated in other countries first.

That completely changes in a vaccine passport situation.
 

yorkie

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I am completely happy to take it.
No safety concerns whatsoever, though I'd prefer to make sure that vulnerable people are vaccinated in other countries first.
I would potentially have agreed with this however I will not delay for two principle reasons:

1) due to the nature of the work I do it would be expected; also I mix with many people in many settings on a regular basis; the isolation requirements would cause a lot of inconvenience, not just for me, but for others. It is not that I am worried about getting it; the chances of me being very ill with this virus is so remote I should be far more worried about other things (such as being involved in a road traffic accident) but it's all the other factors.
2) due to the fact that lockdown enthusiasts would demand we lock down for longer and would probably insist on a winter lockdown if many people in the UK took this approach. We cannot allow this to happen and the only way to silence these hysterical people and to avoid such an eventuality is for almost everyone to be vaccinated, rightly or wrongly.
 

TT-ONR-NRN

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Completely happy to take it and will as soon as it is offered to the youngest adults with no health conditions (the last lot :)), by which time I will be eighteen so permitted to. Minors can’t.

I saw an article in which the Queen allegedly seemed to be saying those who don’t have the vaccine are selfish. Quite honestly if this is true I agree with Her Majesty :D It saves lives and gets us all back to normal!
 

Bantamzen

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No safety concerns whatsoever, though I'd prefer to make sure that vulnerable people are vaccinated in other countries first.

That completely changes in a vaccine passport situation.
This probably is a similar position to me. I'll take it if I need to, for example if it where a requirement to travel to another country. But given that countries are starting to get protectionist towards vaccines produced within their borders, I think now would be a good time for the world to take a deep breath & look at how those most at need of the vaccine around the globe can be prioritised. The vast majority of us don't actually need it, and the mad scramble for it risks leaving many poorer nations struggling to get even their most vulnerable protected.

I am completely happy to take it.

I would potentially have agreed with this however I will not delay for two principle reasons:

1) due to the nature of the work I do it would be expected; also I mix with many people in many settings on a regular basis; the isolation requirements would cause a lot of inconvenience, not just for me, but for others. It is not that I am worried about getting it; the chances of me being very ill with this virus is so remote I should be far more worried about other things (such as being involved in a road traffic accident) but it's all the other factors.
2) due to the fact that lockdown enthusiasts would demand we lock down for longer and would probably insist on a winter lockdown if many people in the UK took this approach. We cannot allow this to happen and the only way to silence these hysterical people and to avoid such an eventuality is for almost everyone to be vaccinated, rightly or wrongly.
I fully understand your reasoning at point 1. As for point 2, I'd say the Chancellor made it quite clear on Wednesday that further lockdowns are simply unaffordable & that within 12 months we will all have to start paying the price of these 12 months. Not that this will stop some of the most hardcore locktivists from trying of course, but come the Autumn when the next budget statement is made the majority of the country will likely be vaccinated and there will be much less appetite from the general public for another one.
 

westv

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Where's the "I have a needle phobia but I will probably have it" option? :D
 

kristiang85

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Where's the "I have a needle phobia but I will probably have it" option? :D

This is me! Although it's a very small price to pay for getting my life back, so I'm running to get it the moment I'm asked.

I should say that everybody who's had it seems to say the jab itself is remarkably painless (I think my phobia started with the BCG, which was just a wholly traumatic experience).
 

Yew

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Since we're starting to hear legitimate claims of vaccine discrimination in some countries, please place me in the 'barging past old ladies in the queue' category.
 

Cdd89

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Indeed, going forward (i.e. after the general population has been done), those with a need to travel may need to be prioritised above the domestic vulnerable for boosters (though would need to pay privately), depending on foreign requirements.
 

duncanp

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I am having my first jab in about 90 minutes time from now.

Not sure whether it will be the Pfizer or the Oxford/Astra Zeneca one.

I dn't have a problem with people who don't have the vaccine as such, but I do have a problem if those people then go on to advocate the continuation of lockdown or other restrictions.
 

52290

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Already had Astro Zenica. 2nd jab due two days before pub beer gardens open. I'll be there!
 

island

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This is me! Although it's a very small price to pay for getting my life back, so I'm running to get it the moment I'm asked.

I should say that everybody who's had it seems to say the jab itself is remarkably painless (I think my phobia started with the BCG, which was just a wholly traumatic experience).
The BCG is particularly cruel and unusual!
 

yorkie

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Good to see such strong confidence in the vaccines on here.

If anyone is in any doubt, do your research, listen to real experts.

I found this interview to be very reassuring:


Professor Shane Crotty, PhD answers a series of COVID 19 vaccine questions including what are the chances of long-term side effects? How safe is RNA vaccine (i.e. Pfizer / BioNTech and Moderna Vaccines) technology? How long does mRNA from a vaccine stay in our cells? What else goes in vaccines? How long does immunity last? Why are T-Cells so important? Why does Pfizer's vaccine need to stay SO cold? Shane Crotty, PhD is a Professor at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology, Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research, Crotty Lab. Professor Crotty also has an academic appointment with the University of California San Diago.

See his full bio here: https://www.lji.org/labs/crotty/#over...

See our new interview with Prof. Crotty on how virus mutations (UK variant and S. African variant) may be impacting COVID-19 transmission and vaccine efficacy. Research referenced in this video from Prof. Crotty and his team was published Jan. 6, 2021, in the prestigious Journal Science: https://science.sciencemag.org/conten... New York Times article highlighting Prof. Shane Crotty's research: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/17/he...
00:00 Introducing Prof. Shane Crotty's Research
0:35 How long does COVID-19 "immune memory" last?
0:57 The three primary aspects of immune memory: antibodies, killer T cells, and helper T cells
2:25 The anatomy (protein makeup) of SARS-CoV-2
3:02 Why is spike protein the primary target?
5:17 Could a mutation allow SARS-CoV-2 to infect without spike protein?
7:02 Utilizing lipid nanoparticles to deliver mRNA and the role of RNA normally
9:52 What human cells does an RNA vaccine go into?
10:36 How long does mRNA from a vaccine stay in human cells?
11:44 What else goes in vaccines besides mRNA and lipid nanoparticles? Any preservatives or adjuvants?
12:30 Why are adjuvants used in many vaccines?
14:08 Protein production from mRNA
15:00 Why utilize the "extra" step of mRNA to code for protein antigens?
17:28 Are mRNA vaccines the future of vaccine development?
19:18 Any chance for mRNA to enter our cells' nucleus?
20:55 The immune response to a coronavirus vaccine
23:17 Expected symptoms from immune response to a vaccine vs. vaccine side effects
25:50 Should people who've had COVID-19 get vaccinated?
27:27 Immunity from COVID vaccine vs. a natural infection
28:30 Why does the Pfizer vaccine need to be stored so cold?
29:04 What would you say to a family member who is nervous about a rushed vaccine and RNA technology?
32:37 What about the possibility of long term side effects from RNA vaccines?
33:30 What's next for Shane Crotty's research team? (This video was recorded on December 16, 2020).

We are very lucky to have so many effective vaccines available, and the UK really is among the world leaders in this field.
 

ChrisC

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This is me! Although it's a very small price to pay for getting my life back, so I'm running to get it the moment I'm asked.

I should say that everybody who's had it seems to say the jab itself is remarkably painless (I think my phobia started with the BCG, which was just a wholly traumatic experience).
Exactly the same here. I had a dreadful experience with the BCG jab, now 50 years ago, and since then, apart from occasional blood tests, have tried to avoid any kind of injections.

I went for mine last week and didn’t feel a thing. I looked the other way and didn’t realise he had actually done it until he told me. A few months ago, when it first became clear that the only way out of this pandemic was through vaccination, the thought of it filled me with fear. As the time got nearer I actually couldn’t wait to go and managed to book an appointment a week or two earlier than I had expected. I now just want to get my life back and can’t wait until I’ve had my 2nd one in May. I’ve already booked
two holidays in UK hotels during June.

Just to add I had no signs of blood or even a mark where I had the jab. Also been fortunate to not have had a sore or aching arm. The only thing I have had which may be a side effect is that I had a few days after the jab when I was cold and even with heating on high couldn’t get warm. I didn’t feel ill and even went on a long walk but I was cold when in the house.
 
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AlterEgo

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For those who haven't had the jab yet, my experience was with the Pfizer vaccine last weekend at a GP surgery. 8am on a Sunday:

- extremely efficient surgery organisation meant I wanted less than five minutes in line
- called in to the treatment room and sat down; asked a few questions about my identity to confirm who I was
- a GP administered the vaccine; it was absolutely painless and I am not lying when I say I barely felt it
- no need for a cotton swab after the jab, no blood or even any sign of an entry point
- I was asked to wait 10 minutes after the jab along with everyone else in reception to check there were no allergic effects
- I developed a sore arm after an hour that lasted the rest of the day - felt like someone had punched me in the upper arm
- the following day I had a sore throat that flared up for maybe an hour
- and that's it.
 

MikeWM

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'Would rather not, but not completely turned off to the idea'. Fairly accurate summary of where I currently stand - I agree it would be interesting to see if there is a difference in a few years time.

I dn't have a problem with people who don't have the vaccine as such, but I do have a problem if those people then go on to advocate the continuation of lockdown or other restrictions.

I'd agree, but I can't say I've encountered any of those (admittedly I'm not actively looking for them!). The people who I've seen say they intend not to have it - for now and/or ever - are generally also against lockdown, masks and all the rest too.
 

WelshBluebird

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I'll have it as soon as I can please.
I dn't have a problem with people who don't have the vaccine as such, but I do have a problem if those people then go on to advocate the continuation of lockdown or other restrictions.
I almost have the opposite view.
If people don't want the vaccine but also don't want things like lockdowns / restrictions etc - then what do they suggest is the route out of the pandemic / the route to stop another hundred thousand people dying in one year from it?
You essentially have to pick one of the two. Either continue to have lockdowns / restrictions (which we know isn't really a feasible option longer term) or accept the roll out of the vaccine.
 

Cdd89

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If people don't want the vaccine but also don't want things like lockdowns / restrictions etc - then what do they suggest is the route out of the pandemic / the route to stop another hundred thousand people dying in one year from it?
I agree with you in a sense (and am pro-vaccination in part for that reason), but would note that it is not for those who were against lockdowns in the first place to come up with an exit plan. That responsibility is on those who demanded lockdowns, and so is it their responsibility to persuade enough people to be vaccinated such that their exit strategy is successful.
 

LAX54

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This is me! Although it's a very small price to pay for getting my life back, so I'm running to get it the moment I'm asked.

I should say that everybody who's had it seems to say the jab itself is remarkably painless (I think my phobia started with the BCG, which was just a wholly traumatic experience).
I remember the BCG from back in the 60's, and there was no choice, you had it full stop, if I recall it was not just one needle but multiple needles all at one time, and it left the BCG mark on the arm, this jab is 100% different, you do not feel a thing, when I had mine was waiting for the medic (RAF) to say 'ready' but all he said was 'done' ! from time of sitting down to 'done' was about a minute, no more, and that time was taken up with just checking again who you were :)

For those who haven't had the jab yet, my experience was with the Pfizer vaccine last weekend at a GP surgery. 8am on a Sunday:

- extremely efficient surgery organisation meant I wanted less than five minutes in line
- called in to the treatment room and sat down; asked a few questions about my identity to confirm who I was
- a GP administered the vaccine; it was absolutely painless and I am not lying when I say I barely felt it
- no need for a cotton swab after the jab, no blood or even any sign of an entry point
- I was asked to wait 10 minutes after the jab along with everyone else in reception to check there were no allergic effects
- I developed a sore arm after an hour that lasted the rest of the day - felt like someone had punched me in the upper arm
- the following day I had a sore throat that flared up for maybe an hour
- and that's it.
Almost same here, certainly no knowledge of the needle going in, and also had a choice to wait 10 to 15 after jab or go straight home....chose the latter :)
 

MikeWM

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I almost have the opposite view.
If people don't want the vaccine but also don't want things like lockdowns / restrictions etc - then what do they suggest is the route out of the pandemic / the route to stop another hundred thousand people dying in one year from it?
You essentially have to pick one of the two. Either continue to have lockdowns / restrictions (which we know isn't really a feasible option longer term) or accept the roll out of the vaccine.

We've been discussing alternatives on here in great depth for months. Protect the vulnerable while letting the healthy reach herd immunity naturally, better use of theraputics, increase NHS capacity, etc. etc.

If we accept 'lockdown until a vaccine' as the accepted public health response to a pandemic going forwards - even though it has never been before - then we're going to have an awful lot of unnecessary problems in the future.
 

Peter C

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I'd be completely happy to have the jab, even though I'm probably a far way away from having mine. I'm a bit scared of needles but not so much now after having heard other peoples' experiences of getting this particular vaccine. A member of my family was sent a text from the GP to book a jab one evening and had had the vaccine that time the next day! Superb work.

-Peter
 

tommy2215

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I'll be having the jab this afternoon since I am in group 6. I'm usually not keen on jabs, but since taking it is the only way to be free from endless lockdowns, the vaccine is most definitely worth taking. The idea that there is some dangerous long term side effect seems a little silly, the vaccine program has been going for almost 4 months now and there have only been minor short term side effects. Its not going to be the case that a year after taking the jab something is suddenly going to strike you.
 

Ostrich

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Completely happy, and already had the first shot (AZ vaccine). I don't know of anyone in my immediate circle who has expressed any reservations at all, apart from one lady who initially "held out" for the Pfizer, but then finished up receiving the AZ anyway.

Same as Red Onion, I'm also a needle phobic, but it turned out to be quite painless. I did have a mild reaction to it (soreness, fatigue) but no more than 48 hours.
Even when I've had the second dose, I reckon I'm still going to adopt social distancing long-term and wear a mask where required - that's just my personal choice. What approach will other forum members adopt?
 

Domh245

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What approach will other forum members adopt?

A week on from whenever I get my jab, I'll be licking all the doorknobs I can find! :D

Joking aside, I'll be ditching all the measures as soon as the government says so (be that before or after I get my jab - being young & healthy getting the jab is more just a formality than any sort of practical intervention!) - at best I'll wear a face covering if I'm feeling particularly grotty in the future
 

RuralRambler

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We've been discussing alternatives on here in great depth for months. Protect the vulnerable while letting the healthy reach herd immunity naturally, better use of theraputics, increase NHS capacity, etc. etc.

If we accept 'lockdown until a vaccine' as the accepted public health response to a pandemic going forwards - even though it has never been before - then we're going to have an awful lot of unnecessary problems in the future.

Trouble is we were pathetically inept at "protecting the vulnerable" given the huge numbers of people who caught it in hospitals and care homes, which in theory should be "safe" places. If the vulnerable aren't safe in care settings, then it's impossible to "protect the vulnerable". We need a wholesale re think of how care homes and hospitals are built/operated if we're going to go down the route of locking up the vulnerable for a year or two whilst everyone else acquires herd immunity.
 
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