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Businesses in England that will still restrict entry (via face masks) after July 19th

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island

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easyJet now allows self-declaration of mask exemption, you must email them before travel though and cannot declare it at the airport.

It won’t be accepted when travelling to or from certain countries where evidence is required by law.
 
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Yew

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easyJet now allows self-declaration of mask exemption, you must email them before travel though and cannot declare it at the airport.

It won’t be accepted when travelling to or from certain countries where evidence is required by law.

A chronically small step, but a step nonetheless.
 

asharpe

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I donated blood a couple of days ago and didn't even consider wearing a mask.

I realised about half way through the donation that everyone else was wearing one as the nurse started talking to me about my septum piercing.

The snacks table had reopened too and a mask definitly wasn't required there.
 

bramling

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I see the ferry in Fowey harbour is still insisting on masks, despite it being completely open air.
Ice cream shop had one tiny sign asking people to put masks on. Everyone was, except for me, despite the staff being completely unmasked. Bonkers! Why would you even think about masking if the staff aren't?
Petrol station just up the road has big shouty signs on every pump "Mask up to fill up!" and "No mask no entry" on the shop door. Ignored it all, the proprietor was wearing her mask on her chin anyway and said nothing about my bare face.
Most places seem sensible, but the habit people have for wearing the daft things is more stubborn than I expected it to be.
Mother in law put one on outside when she judged the street was too crowded. I know better than to try to educate her on the several ways this is completely futile. I'm waiting for her head to explode when she sees me stride into a shop bare faced!

A bookshop near me has copious mask signage all over the front, including the message “most of our staff have only had one vaccine dose so you should wear a mask to protect them”.

To crown it off, not one of the staff were wearing masks themselves.

I chose to ignore the signage, as about half the other customers were doing, nothing said.
 

johnnychips

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I wonder if many of these establishments just have signs up in case some unspecified ‘inspector from the Council’ comes round, or whether they genuinely believe in masks.
 

adc82140

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The local hardware store I had a spat with over their sign "no mask, no entry, no exceptions" has somewhat softened their stance. It now says "we would appreciate you wearing a mask if you are able to". The fact that B&Q is a short trip away may have had some bearing on this.
 

greyman42

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I wonder if many of these establishments just have signs up in case some unspecified ‘inspector from the Council’ comes round, or whether they genuinely believe in masks.
There is no requirement for any signs regarding masks so what is the inspector from the council going to do?
 

adc82140

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There is no requirement for any signs regarding masks so what is the inspector from the council going to do?
The "rules" have changed so many times, some businesses can be forgiven for not having a clue what they should be doing.
 

greyman42

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The "rules" have changed so many times, some businesses can be forgiven for not having a clue what they should be doing.
Businesses should know the rules, they are pretty straight forward to the rest of us.
 

adc82140

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Businesses should know the rules, they are pretty straight forward to the rest of us.
I overheard a supermarket conversation along the lines of "we have to wear masks because it's expected by the government". People don't understand the nuances. These same people are running businesses. I blame the government for inconsistent messaging. It should have remained "personal choice" and leave it at that.
 

Tester

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I am currently on board 1B39, 18:50 Birmingham New Street to Euston, and am being repeatedly advised that I should be wearing a face covering due to being in a confined space with limited fresh air.

I'm not entirely convinced that this is the message that the industry wishes to convey!
 

yorkie

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I overheard a supermarket conversation along the lines of "we have to wear masks because it's expected by the government". People don't understand the nuances. These same people are running businesses. I blame the government for inconsistent messaging. It should have remained "personal choice" and leave it at that.
My local supermarket now has almost all staff unmasked and the proportion of customers who are masked is slowly decreasing :)
I am currently on board 1B39, 18:50 Birmingham New Street to Euston, and am being repeatedly advised that I should be wearing a face covering due to being in a confined space with limited fresh air.

I'm not entirely convinced that this is the message that the industry wishes to convey!
Is that the Guard saying that? I'd complain to Avanti. Sadly I doubt the company will do anything. Some Guards do seem to want the industry to fail.

I hope most of the customers are unmasked; that's certainly been my experience of most trains, even the 0822 from York the other day, being a peak train I had expected more people to be masked.

I did not hear any Guards make pro-mask announcements on my journey yesterday, which was nice. Sadly there were some awful automated ones on Northern. Most passengers took no notice, thankfully.
 

johnnychips

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As a schoolteacher, we were always told to put displays on the wall: the students need advice and inspiration, Ofsted will like it etc. I had always been dubious about this, and one day near the end of class, I led my class to another room and did a ‘test’ about what was on the wall in the class they had been in ten minutes previously, and indeed for every lesson that term. I think about 15% of what was on the wall was recalled.

Similarly, stores, buses and transport interchanges can have all the notices they like about respect, or ‘you must wear a mask’ where the haven’t changed them, but in the end I feel people just don’t notice such messages. They make their own decision.
 

greyman42

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I overheard a supermarket conversation along the lines of "we have to wear masks because it's expected by the government". People don't understand the nuances. These same people are running businesses. I blame the government for inconsistent messaging. It should have remained "personal choice" and leave it at that.
As far as i am aware the government messaging is "personal choice" and that has been consistent.
Perhaps some independent businesses claim "the rules have been changed so many times" as an excuse to display outdated legislation.
 

trebor79

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I wonder if many of these establishments just have signs up in case some unspecified ‘inspector from the Council’ comes round, or whether they genuinely believe in masks.
So I left a Google Maps review for one of the establishments on my holiday. Beach shop which had a bizarre three zone system for browsing and paying which even the staff didn't understand because they kept asking browsers to leave whilst there was another customer paying - caused lots of arguments. But they were absolutely insistent upon mask wearing. Here's how my conversation went:
"Oh, can you wear a mask please?" Both staff members completely unmasked!
"No I'd rather not thanks"
"But we insist that you do, it's our policy"
"What's the point, I'm the only customer in the shop and both of you are bare-faced?"
"It's out policy and if you argue we won't serve you?"
"I don't have one"
"You can buy one for 50p" pointing to a selection of surgical type masks dangling in the breeze on a peg fixed to the door, so hygienic!
"I'm exempt"
"Oh"

Was then served without further fuss. Other customers were having similar issues.

The owner responded to my review saying that her staff take a lateral flow test before each shift (not at all apparent to customers) "so they don't have to spend all day in stuffy mask". She didn't seem to understand that the unmasked staff insisting on customers masking was causing a lot of conflict and must have been very wearing for her employees.
She informs me that Cornwall is "an area of additional COVID support and although not mandatory masks are strongly advised, so I've decided to make them mandatory in my shop".

Later in the day I went back in, no discussion about masks as they remembered me, but they tried to kick out a guy who came in behind me. He quite aggressively told them he was standing in the zone that the sign said he could. As I was leaving he had a pop at me for not wearing a mask, so I responded that it was
a). Pointless for several reasons, not least of which the staff weren't masked
b). None of his business
He actually started squaring up to me before he either noticed I was considerably bigger and fitter than him, or though better of starting a punch-up in front of a beach full of kids.

Whole thing is becoming so divisive and a lot of small business owners in Cornwall seem to be neurotic about them. There was a (dreadful) cafe we went to in Tintagel that was still insisiting on the nonsesnsical putting a mask on to walk to the table. Not a single member of staff was wearing a mask correctly, either not at all, on their chin or nose poking out. I only put one on to keep the peace with the mother in law who seems to think all of this COVID theatre is "common sense".

A bookshop near me has copious mask signage all over the front, including the message “most of our staff have only had one vaccine dose so you should wear a mask to protect them”.

To crown it off, not one of the staff were wearing masks themselves.

I chose to ignore the signage, as about half the other customers were doing, nothing said.
That's what I do now. The only place I was challenged was the beach cafe. I'm not sure what would have happened in the Tintagel cafe. I suspect nothing given the staff clearly couldn't be bothered with them (nor could they be bothered to wipe down the tables but that's another story).
 

35B

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Whole thing is becoming so divisive and a lot of small business owners in Cornwall seem to be neurotic about them.
My godmother lives in north Cornwall, and neuroticism and division there about Covid is long standing. I suspect it has a lot to do with the tension between local population and incomers, and the feeling (to some extent justified) that Covid was being brought in by people trying to get round restrictions in the first lockdown, and again at Christmas. Certainly in her village, she has had to persuade her (adult) children not to come down at those times (even to an isolated cottage in effective quarantine) because of the tensions it would have caused for her in the community rather than on health grounds - and she is (for reasons of health and age) very cautious about Covid, so was generally supportive of restrictions at the time.
 

bramling

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My godmother lives in north Cornwall, and neuroticism and division there about Covid is long standing. I suspect it has a lot to do with the tension between local population and incomers, and the feeling (to some extent justified) that Covid was being brought in by people trying to get round restrictions in the first lockdown, and again at Christmas. Certainly in her village, she has had to persuade her (adult) children not to come down at those times (even to an isolated cottage in effective quarantine) because of the tensions it would have caused for her in the community rather than on health grounds - and she is (for reasons of health and age) very cautious about Covid, so was generally supportive of restrictions at the time.

Where the neurosis logic falls down, is do we assume no one from these sorts of areas ever goes elsewhere?

This sort of rank hypocrisy is rife with some people. It’s the same with people who don’t like outsiders in “their” road or village, but yet of course they regularly travel to other people’s areas for any number of reasons. Same with people who are parochial about parking spaces or cars using “their” road - do these people never drive elsewhere themselves?

Having said all that, I can understand people in Cornwall being peeved at the moment, the place does seem to have been the place *everyone* has chosen as a substitute for a foreign holiday, and I can well imagine this causing issues, especially with some of the people this will have meant are visiting who wouldn’t normally be doing so. It’s no different in my town - since this all at started the church yard is full of furloughs hanging around having picnics on grave stones, which many people find very disrespectful - I’d be furious if I went to visit a relative’s grave and found a family having a picnic on it.

As a country we have become too engrossed in Covid and lost sight of any bigger picture, which is why it really is time to move on.
 

35B

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Where the neurosis logic falls down, is do we assume no one from these sorts of areas ever goes elsewhere?

This sort of rank hypocrisy is rife with some people. It’s the same with people who don’t like outsiders in “their” road or village, but yet of course they regularly travel to other people’s areas for any number of reasons. Same with people who are parochial about parking spaces or cars using “their” road - do these people never drive elsewhere themselves?

Having said all that, I can understand people in Cornwall being peeved at the moment, the place does seem to have been the place *everyone* has chosen as a substitute for a foreign holiday, and I can well imagine this causing issues, especially with some of the people this will have meant are visiting who wouldn’t normally be doing so. It’s no different in my town - since this all at started the church yard is full of furloughs hanging around having picnics on grave stones, which many people find very disrespectful - I’d be furious if I went to visit a relative’s grave and found a family having a picnic on it.

As a country we have become too engrossed in Covid and lost sight of any bigger picture, which is why it really is time to move on.
I'm not sure that in her case it's hypocrisy*, but more a reflection of issues that have been bubbling under for a very long time about "incomers" squeezing out locals. This is a relatively isolated area, with limited mixing off season, so the outbound travel for the resident population is limited in comparison to the role of people coming in.

As for businesses now, the adjustment from a restrictive set of rules to a more relaxed position is confusing, and different people have different view of risk.

* - for clarity, I fully agree that the position is inconsistent.
 

trebor79

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Having said all that, I can understand people in Cornwall being peeved at the moment, the place does seem to have been the place *everyone* has chosen as a substitute for a foreign holiday, and I can well imagine this causing issues, especially with some of the people this will have meant are visiting who wouldn’t normally be doing so.
Given a large part of their economy is dependant upon tourism, they should be grateful. Let's face it, if there was no tourism a lot of Cornwall would just be a prettier version of some of the deprived ex-industrial towns and villages in the north.

I'm not sure that in her case it's hypocrisy*, but more a reflection of issues that have been bubbling under for a very long time about "incomers" squeezing out locals. This is a relatively isolated area, with limited mixing off season, so the outbound travel for the resident population is limited in comparison to the role of people coming in.

As for businesses now, the adjustment from a restrictive set of rules to a more relaxed position is confusing, and different people have different view of risk.
I'm not sure it is confusing. There is no legal requirement for any particular COVID measures to be taken. So business owners are perfectly able to operate as normal. Some are, some have a a sign up asking for or "mandating" things like masks but actually don't actively try to get customers to comply, and some are complete zealots. I saw far more rude "NO MASK NO ENTRY" signs in Cornwall than I have at home in Norfolk, and I simply didn't give those places my business.
As for the 'hospitality' businesses like Pengennis Pasties still enforcing the ludicrous "Mask on whilst walking to the table" nonsense which was greeted with almost universal derision by the industry when it was law, they deserve to go under. They won't in Cornwall this year, but I should have known a place like that would serve stale scones and concentrate out of a carton instead of the "fresh pressed apple juice" on the menu for £2.80. Despite all the hygiene theatre they couldn't be bothered to wipe the tables down after use. Taking the P out of the punters all ways.

My overall view of tourist businesses in Cornwall was that they are happy to use the extra punters in the area to rack up prices and downgrade service (unable to get a take way pizza one evening "We're really busy and short staffed", yet were perfectly happy to have people sit in the bar guzzling expensive cocktails whilst waiting for a table for a sit-down meal). There was also more blatant rip-off - the stale scones, cheap juice at premium prices etc safe in the knowledge there's a fresh batch of gullible punters in town every day so reputation doesn't matter.
Our original holiday cottage booking got cancelled in late April "Because the owners have sold and the new owners are going to live in it", only to see the property advertised for rent again within weeks, with the same furniture and decor and same agency only £500/week more expensive!

I'm actually wondering if I want to go back there next year or try to persuade wife and mother in law to go somewhere different for a change.

As a country we have become too engrossed in Covid and lost sight of any bigger picture, which is why it really is time to move on.
Agree.
 

35B

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I'm not sure it is confusing. There is no legal requirement for any particular COVID measures to be taken. So business owners are perfectly able to operate as normal. Some are, some have a a sign up asking for or "mandating" things like masks but actually don't actively try to get customers to comply, and some are complete zealots.
You make my point - business owners are having to make decisions in a developing situation, in the context of government advice pointing one way, law pointing another, and both customers and locals who have their own views. I know from discussions at my church about things we do how finding a way through the various points of view and legal requirements is a challenge. Also, as your examples of some caterers shows, it's not always good news if companies work down to the legal bare minimum.

I was in Wales a couple of weeks ago, where the regulations have remained tighter than in England. Almost all of the places we visited were both enforcing the law, and also doing so in a calm manner that avoided it becoming an issue.
 

trebor79

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I was in Wales a couple of weeks ago, where the regulations have remained tighter than in England. Almost all of the places we visited were both enforcing the law, and also doing so in a calm manner that avoided it becoming an issue.
I think where something is law (even if I and others think it's stupid) there is little argument because no one seriously expects a business to ignore the law. What I have issue with is people making up their own nonsensical rules (eg from my post yesterday of expecting customers but not staff to mask) and then getting all defensive when the punters who ultimately give them their living challenge it.
 

35B

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I think where something is law (even if I and others think it's stupid) there is little argument because no one seriously expects a business to ignore the law. What I have issue with is people making up their own nonsensical rules (eg from my post yesterday of expecting customers but not staff to mask) and then getting all defensive when the punters who ultimately give them their living challenge it.
And on that point, I tend to agree. I'm involved in organising an event for a couple of months' time, and how we balance what volunteers will be willing to do with what regulations we have to follow with what our visitors will expect is going to be challenging, with plenty of scope to get it wrong.
 

trebor79

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And on that point, I tend to agree. I'm involved in organising an event for a couple of months' time, and how we balance what volunteers will be willing to do with what regulations we have to follow with what our visitors will expect is going to be challenging, with plenty of scope to get it wrong.
I think you need to start from the position of "there are no regulations [WRT covid], and leave masks etc up to individuals.
Taking my son to Beavers later. Wife tells me "They are asking you to wear a mask when you drop off and pick up". Utterly pointless, I won't do any such thing, but I know better than to say anything other than "Righto".
 

35B

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I think you need to start from the position of "there are no regulations [WRT covid], and leave masks etc up to individuals.
Taking my son to Beavers later. Wife tells me "They are asking you to wear a mask when you drop off and pick up". Utterly pointless, I won't do any such thing, but I know better than to say anything other than "Righto".
I will be planning in the context of an event subject to two national organising bodies, which may have their own requirements, and relying on goodwill (including volunteering) from people who will I know a range of attitudes to how Covid risk is managed; I know that not all of those views are consistent or coherent (e.g. the individual who is adamant that there must be rigorous surface cleaning and mask wearing, yet whose mask rarely covers the nostrils). As is the case with your wife, discretion is a necessary part of the jigsaw.
 

bramling

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Given a large part of their economy is dependant upon tourism, they should be grateful. Let's face it, if there was no tourism a lot of Cornwall would just be a prettier version of some of the deprived ex-industrial towns and villages in the north.


I'm not sure it is confusing. There is no legal requirement for any particular COVID measures to be taken. So business owners are perfectly able to operate as normal. Some are, some have a a sign up asking for or "mandating" things like masks but actually don't actively try to get customers to comply, and some are complete zealots. I saw far more rude "NO MASK NO ENTRY" signs in Cornwall than I have at home in Norfolk, and I simply didn't give those places my business.
As for the 'hospitality' businesses like Pengennis Pasties still enforcing the ludicrous "Mask on whilst walking to the table" nonsense which was greeted with almost universal derision by the industry when it was law, they deserve to go under. They won't in Cornwall this year, but I should have known a place like that would serve stale scones and concentrate out of a carton instead of the "fresh pressed apple juice" on the menu for £2.80. Despite all the hygiene theatre they couldn't be bothered to wipe the tables down after use. Taking the P out of the punters all ways.

My overall view of tourist businesses in Cornwall was that they are happy to use the extra punters in the area to rack up prices and downgrade service (unable to get a take way pizza one evening "We're really busy and short staffed", yet were perfectly happy to have people sit in the bar guzzling expensive cocktails whilst waiting for a table for a sit-down meal). There was also more blatant rip-off - the stale scones, cheap juice at premium prices etc safe in the knowledge there's a fresh batch of gullible punters in town every day so reputation doesn't matter.
Our original holiday cottage booking got cancelled in late April "Because the owners have sold and the new owners are going to live in it", only to see the property advertised for rent again within weeks, with the same furniture and decor and same agency only £500/week more expensive!

I'm actually wondering if I want to go back there next year or try to persuade wife and mother in law to go somewhere different for a change.


Agree.

I must say this hasn't been my impression of Cornwall in the past, it may well be the case that the tourist traps are like this, but the moral of the story is to avoid those. The Land's End theme park is another example of something which (IMO) gives a poor impression.

I can only speak as I find, but my experience has always been Cornwall (and Devon) compare favorably to many other parts of the UK when it comes to people being pleasant and friendly. There are bad apples anywhere, but IME one is less likely to encounter one there.

Its a fair point about Cornwall relying on tourism, but that doesn't mean people holidaying there have to behave badly. With British holidaymakers sadly one never has to look to far to find that.
 

HST274

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I do not carry a red hat around with me.

If a business has an arbitrary rule which requires me to wear a red hat in order to enter, I will not be able to comply with the rule because I do not carry a red hat around with me.

Given that it is now no longer a legal requirement to wear a mask in any setting, why do businesses expect that people are carrying masks around with them? I certainly don't carry one 'just in case'.
I would say this is a bit of a false comparison even if the message is well meant. I think this is a better comparison:

21st December, 2053 Bluehat-spotty-bad disease is first contracted after someone eats moon cheese. Within weeks scientists have determined that the red hats that moon cheese doctors wear are ideal to stop the contraction. Within months the new fungal disease has spread rapidly. Countries are locking down. The moon colonies are locked up, and signs are everywhere- 'if one has travelled to the moon in the last 14 days please QUARANTINE'. Soon all the world is locked down. Red hats are also increasing rapidly. On the moon they are being sold in bulk at prices higher that that of anti-gravity rock. In the little UK the government is as usual... lost. Eventually they too lockdown. Soon in shops red hats are everywhere. Those who once thought red hats were for the scared, are now looking with distaste at bare heads. No thought is spared for those who suffer from cannot-wear-a-hat-disease and are therefore exempt. Then Joris Bohnson makes them mandatory, as the country starts to open up. There is doubt over effectiveness but they are still worn by almost all, red hats dotting every scene with any people.

A year later, along with another two lockdowns and increases and decreases of Bluehat-spotty-bad disease, the country is finally starting to open up, and different factions protest over whether- red hats or not??? Since the start of this virus so many different things have happened. Every house has little stashes of the itchy cloth red hats, the 'one use' ones that everyone where's 200 times. These one use ones are also starting to be eaten by pets, end up in the ocean and fall on the streets. Many people instead have beautifully decorated silk hats that have feathers an glitter, but these are far less effective. Then they become no longer mandatory. Shops that are coated in 'red hat mandatory' signs begin to take them down, though some forget to decode the robot message that the robot assistants have been blaring the last however many months. Some shops however like red hats. They are convinced, whether right or wrong that red hats are necessary to keep people safe from Bluehat-spotty-bad disease.

Now think, for months now red hats have been everywhere. You have stashes in your house, your coat, your pockets. They go at 50p for 10 on the streets. Many businesses 'request' (Speaker's blaring- PLEASE WEAR A HAT FOR THE SAFETY OF OTHERS YOU SELFISH PEOPLE!!!) you wear a hat, despite the fact that they suffocate the heads and irritate the chips that the 2020 covid vaccine put in you (
joke). Despite them being not mandatory, would it really be that disbelievable that a business just might expect you to have a red hat somewhere when there are millions everywhere, in your car, coat etc..........

And there is a similar comparison. I had fun writing that.
 

Bikeman78

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I think you need to start from the position of "there are no regulations [WRT covid], and leave masks etc up to individuals.
Taking my son to Beavers later. Wife tells me "They are asking you to wear a mask when you drop off and pick up". Utterly pointless, I won't do any such thing, but I know better than to say anything other than "Righto".
I've never worn a mask outside. It's a ludicrous idea. It was about 50/50 amongst the parents at the end of the summer term. I didn't do the school run today but I guess it has dropped further. All one way systems abolished and the second entrance has reopened. This is good for me as it roughly halves the walking time. Hopefully it will also reduce the road rage at the main entrance as around 40% of people will now use the other entrance and there is plenty of space to park there.
 

wireforever

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Not many in Sainsburys today wearing masks only the silver foxes like myself no staff masked up.Don't know about our local beavers but the nursery next door asks parents to wear a mask when waiting outside to drop off/pick up children and the local primary school doesn't
 

Jonny

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Well for all of my first three trips out post 19th July, it was a mixed bag for both customers and staff. Generally staff were not wearing masks.
 

_toommm_

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I don’t wear a mask at work - I stopped wearing one as soon as April 12th or whatever came round. Now though, we’re in the bizarre position where customers are complaining that we’re not wearing masks, and out of courtesy we (staff) should wear them because the customers are bothering to wear them.

Just twelve months ago though, we had customers in our faces shouting and not sticking to the mask rule for a ten minute shop, whilst we had to endure them for hours on end. Hypocrisy.

Customers have got a lot worse though, and it’s made the spoilt even more spoilt.
 
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