CAF to build 43 new DLR units

edwin_m

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For all the discussion of seating here, as someone who spent the past year and a half living near Westferry, I'll point out that being unable to board during the morning rush hour was a thing that did happen. Having more space for standees would be nothing but good, in my book. The DLR has in some ways been a victim of its own success, hence the lengthening to three-car trains previously, and that now doesn't suffice. I hope the additional space made available by being a single unit will provide a decent capacity uplift, and I do wonder where else the DLR can go to improve capacity.
Crossrail will help, although I see TfL are now threatening to mothball it if they don't get more funding.
 
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GregA

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I hope the additional space made available by being a single unit will provide a decent capacity uplift, and I do wonder where else the DLR can go to improve capacity.
More trains closer together perhaps? I think the signalling systems is moving block so it should be able to cope with trains running closer together (possibly with reduced speeds though).
That said I'm sure I read a while ago that Bank station DLR platforms were at capacity in terms of being able to deal with the number of people leaving an arriving train, and the number waiting for and boarding departing one, so perhaps this needs sorted before any more trains per hour can be run in practice (although I can't imagine platform and staircase widening underground comes cheap!).
 

Taunton

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I do wonder where else the DLR can go to improve capacity.
Crossrail will take a considerable amount of demand off the DLR. In your case (and mine), Canary Wharf to The City; Beckton line/Excel (via Custom House) to The City; Woolwich to The City.
 

Nym

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More trains closer together perhaps? I think the signalling systems is moving block so it should be able to cope with trains running closer together (possibly with reduced speeds though).
That said I'm sure I read a while ago that Bank station DLR platforms were at capacity in terms of being able to deal with the number of people leaving an arriving train, and the number waiting for and boarding departing one, so perhaps this needs sorted before any more trains per hour can be run in practice (although I can't imagine platform and staircase widening underground comes cheap!).
It is "Moving Block" but it's very badly configured. Any time spent on the eastbound platform at Westferry will show you just how bad it can get.

I use the term "Moving Block" as it's not, and very little is, it's small blocks with a distance defined overlap and protection zone.

Spending some time optimising the signalling system would help capacity rather than everything backing up into default authorities whenever anything goes wrong. This optimisation is why the highest frequency line on LUL is still fixed block signalled.

Another example of poor ATP / ATC / Signalling optimisation (*and to be honest, demonstration of very poor practice) would be starting from Moorgate S/B on the Northern Line. (Same signalling system).
 

Taunton

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It is "Moving Block" but it's very badly configured. Any time spent on the eastbound platform at Westferry will show you just how bad it can get.

I use the term "Moving Block" as it's not, and very little is, it's small blocks with a distance defined overlap and protection zone.
Curiously, the original GEC signal system used to give better headways. I can recall at busy times that trains would stop maybe just a car length behind the previous one delayed at a station, as if buses, and would move forward almost immediately it was clear - Limehouse eastbound was a common point to see this. Then it was replaced by Canadian-developed SelTrac. Now I was familiar with this from its first implementation on the Vancouver Skytrain, where it ran some impressively short headway interleaved operations during the 1986 world fair Expo there, with multiple trains moving together along the same track - that's 35 years ago. What's in place now on the DLR is nothing like that, it's as if it is conventional signalling with big overlaps.
 

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