Heysham branch - has it ever had other stations?

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Gloster

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According to Wikipedia, but checked against heyshamheritage.org.uk , there was Middleton Road Bridge Halt on the outskirts of Heysham that was open for one year in 1904-1905. The line itself was always primarily for the ship connection, but local services did run to Lancaster (LNWR), though mostly for staff at the harbour. I think that local goods facilities did exist, but were only small scale.

EDIT: A more thorough read of the Heysham site suggests that W.pedia is wrong or incomplete, and the halt was either open for longer or reopened at a later date, possibly the start of electric services.
 
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furnessvale

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Has the Heysham Port/Harbour branch ever had other stations, if so where? Or was it only ever used for connecting with the ships?

Was there freight?
Freight to Trimpells, a consortium of Trinidad Asphalt, ICI and Shell.
 

Gloster

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There is a Facebook group: The Lancaster to Morecambe and Heysham Electrics with lots of information.
 

Bevan Price

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Has the Heysham Port/Harbour branch ever had other stations, if so where? Or was it only ever used for connecting with the ships?

Was there freight?
Freight still runs. Flasks to/from Heysham Power Station. About once a week, I think.
 

randyrippley

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Freight to Trimpells, a consortium of Trinidad Asphalt, ICI and Shell.
Major chemical site
Nitration works for explosives and fertiliser
WWII oil refinery for making high octane AVGAS

So a lot of chemicals moving both in and out.

Also don't forget the harbour carried a lot of rail freight - the current lorry park was originally transfer sidings
Not all of it was ferry traffic - for instance Fishers had a timber importing terminal there (mainly Amazon in origin)

Brief history of the Trimpell works
 
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etr221

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According to Wikipedia, but checked against heyshamheritage.org.uk , there was Middleton Road Bridge Halt on the outskirts of Heysham that was open for one year in 1904-1905. The line itself was always primarily for the ship connection, but local services did run to Lancaster (LNWR), though mostly for staff at the harbour. I think that local goods facilities did exist, but were only small scale.

EDIT: A more thorough read of the Heysham site suggests that W.pedia is wrong or incomplete, and the halt was either open for longer or reopened at a later date, possibly the start of electric services.
According to Quick's Chronology, Middleton Road (alias Middleton Road Bridge) was opened 1904-07-11 (with the line) (note in Quick 'not even in company tt'), closed 1905-06. As he is reckoned as the authority, I would regard any subsequent reopening very doubtful.

It was a Midland Railway development (of the port, with railway to serve it), so services via the Midland line to Lancaster Green Ayre and beyond, with (some) local services reversing back up the spur Lancaster Castle (LNWR station), until the 1960s Beeching era closures.
 

randyrippley

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That Heysham Heritage site seems to imply that the Middleton Road wooden platform (not even a station) was a temporary structure built to serve the two navvy villages involved in building the harbour. At the time there was only a rough track linking the area to Heysham village and Poulton-le-Sands. Roads followed once the harbour was built
However somewhere I've read that there was a later station on the site. How accurate that is, I've no idea.
Things are complicated by what appeared to be the wooden remains of a one-coach platform on the northwest side of the track where it skerted Heysham Moss in the area of the modern Meldon Road. Probably removed by now, it's location made no sense unless there was another temporary village near there
 

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