Station association

Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

EbbwJunction1

Established Member
Joined
25 Mar 2010
Messages
1,233
Ascott-under-Wychwood is the start of a recently re-doubled section of the Cotswold Line between Oxford and Hereford; the station immediately prior to it is Charlbury, but this is on a single line section.
 

jimm

Established Member
Joined
6 Apr 2012
Messages
5,089
Ascott-under-Wychwood is the start of a recently re-doubled section of the Cotswold Line between Oxford and Hereford; the station immediately prior to it is Charlbury, but this is on a single line section.
Charlbury is not on a single-line section. The redoubled section of the line in Oxfordshire runs from Ascott to just south of Charlbury.
 

fishquinn

Established Member
Associate Staff
Quizmaster
Joined
4 Oct 2013
Messages
6,595
Location
Warwickshire
Charlbury is not on a single-line section. The redoubled section of the line in Oxfordshire runs from Ascott to just south of Charlbury.
You're right but this doesn't really matter in terms of the association so game play can continue from St Neots.
 
Joined
7 Nov 2013
Messages
798
Location
Where my keyboard has no £ key
Mirfield was the location of an experimental colour light speed signalling system, installed by the LMS in the 1930s.
Another foray into non-standard signals by one of the Big Four was cluster colour lights, tried by the Southern Railway around London Bridge.
 

EbbwJunction1

Established Member
Joined
25 Mar 2010
Messages
1,233
The first Reading station was opened on 30 March 1840 as the temporary western terminus of the original line of the Great Western Railway. This was as a result of the extension of the line from Twyford through the Sonning Cutting to Reading.
 

EbbwJunction1

Established Member
Joined
25 Mar 2010
Messages
1,233
Mr G R H Mullins was the Station Master at Doncaster between 1849 and 1855; from there, he moved to be the Station Master at Boston from 1855 to 1871.
 

EbbwJunction1

Established Member
Joined
25 Mar 2010
Messages
1,233
Ainsdale station has mounted on its external wall a John Agar (Bury) clock face, the internal workings of which were converted from pendulum to electric drive some time ago. The clock face, badly faded by a century of sun, was restored to 'as new' condition and transferred to the new station building to continue the link with a clock maker who supplied clocks to many stations along the line and across the wider north of England network. One such station was Upholland, although that clock is no longer in situ, having been sold by auction for £1,600 in March 2018.
 

Top