Trivia: Stations in settlements named after the Station

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PTR 444

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New Milton I believe was not really near anything when it first opened and was named after a nearby sub post office with the town of New Milton gradually building up around the station
It was near the village of Milton, now known as Old Milton.
 

Mcr Warrior

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Elephant and Castle
Surely that area of Southwark in South London is effectively named after the mid-late 18th century coaching inn of the same name? (The railway station not being opened until a hundred years or so later). :?:
 

davetheguard

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Sarsden Halt in Oxfordshire. I believe a few buildings cluster around the site of the former halt on the now closed GWR Kingham - Chipping Norton - Banbury line.
 

Pigeon

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Surely that area of Southwark in South London is effectively named after the mid-late 18th century coaching inn of the same name? (The railway station not being opened until a hundred years or so later). :?:

Yes, and the one in London is not the only one, either; there are several scattered about. According to http://www.worcesternews.co.uk/news...is-castle-but-the-best-examples-are-in-wales/ there's one between Hereford and Monmouth, for instance, and there was one in Worcester itself too.
 

Swanley 59

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Widdrington Station
If closed stations allowed then Stannington Station.
Lots of separate settlements sprang up around former North-Eastern railway stations that were far removed from the towns and villages that they were meant to serve. Widdrington Station is a now a much bigger village than Widdrington. Stannington Station is heading the same way - if it isn't already.
 

Ashley Hill

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Woody Bay, on the north Devon Coast, not quite a settlement, but worth mentioning I think.

When the Lynton & Barnstaple Railway opened in 1900, the cove was called Wooda Bay and the corresponding station was also named Wooda Bay (despite being 1.5 miles away and, in true L&B fashion, about 600ft higher up.) In 1901 the railway decided that ‘Woody Bay’ would be more marketable and therefore changed the name of the station, and correspondingly the landowner changed the name of the cove and nearby pier. However it was all to fail as the location never made any progress as the resort, the landowner ended up bankrupt and in debtors prison for 12 years and the L&B was closed in 1935.

The cove, however, is still now called Woody Bay.
So that explains why the single line tablets were Wooda Bay.
image.jpegPhoto from Bonhams
 

Oveloel

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Surely that area of Southwark in South London is effectively named after the mid-late 18th century coaching inn of the same name? (The railway station not being opened until a hundred years or so later). :?:
Was the area called that before the station though? I would've thought it was just the edges of the Newington/Lambeth/Walworth areas (maybe Borough too although I'm not sure if that one existed pre-railway either!)
 

Wilts Wanderer

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So that explains why the single line tablets were Wooda Bay.
View attachment 102800Photo from Bonhams

Indeed yes!

I suppose you could say that anywhere that a settlement was entirely created for / dependent on a railway station is likely to qualify for this topic. For instance Riccarton Junction on the Waverley Route, which didn’t exist before the railway arrived, and unsurprisingly has since disappeared after its closure I think?
 

swt_passenger

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Indeed yes!

I suppose you could say that anywhere that a settlement was entirely created for / dependent on a railway station is likely to qualify for this topic. For instance Riccarton Junction on the Waverley Route, which didn’t exist before the railway arrived, and unsurprisingly has since disappeared after its closure I think?
I think it has basically returned to nature. Didn’t almost the entire population work for the railway while it existed?
 

nanstallon

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Micheldever Station
A former station, but Halwill Junction.
There is a well established, albeit small, village called Halwill with an old parish church about a mile away from the old station, around which a village has formed, called Halwill Junction.
 

Roger1973

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Loughborough Junction, in south London (was close to Loughborough Road, named after Baron Loughborough who lived at Loughborough House)
 

PeterC

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I thought that Tring Station would have been on page one.

There must be some that have lost their station too. Once I know is Fordoun near Laurencekirk which seems to have had no nucleated settlement before the railway came. The settlement was originally Fordoun Station but has now lost the suffix.

There are also a few where a station with a double name has lead to one of the settlements losing its separate identity. Gidea Park was built in Squirrels Heath but named Gidea Park and Squirrels Heath as GP was a more upmarket area. Most people now would identify Gidea Park as the area around theh station rather than the original garden suburb half a mile away.
 
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Train jaune

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Bay Horse, near Lancaster. Think the station was named after the next door pub, situated in countryside not really near any of the existing villages. Now anything within a mile has a Bay Horse address. No actual village just isolated farms and houses.
 

Roger1973

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There are also a few where a station with a double name has lead to one of the settlements losing its separate identity. Gidea Park was built in Squirrels Heath but named Gidea Park and Squirrels Heath as GP was a more upmarket area. Most people now would identify Gidea Park as the area around theh station rather than the original garden suburb half a mile away.

'Lee for Burnt Ash' Station on the South Eastern had a similar effect - the pre-railway settlement of Lee was the Lewisham side of Lee Green, and the smaller settlement of Burnt Ash was south of the station. Not many people would now know where 'Burnt Ash' is as a place.
 

randyrippley

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There are settlement named Seaton Junction and Chard Junction after the former stations, although both closed in the 1960s with their respective branch lines.
Except Chard Junction should actually be known as Perry Street. Everyone seems to forget that the village and the road share the same name. "Perry Street" is the name for that section of the Fosse Way


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Morecambe
It was Poulton-le-Sands before the railway came and created a new town named after the bay.
But some say it's the wrong bay anyway and that Roman Morecambe Bay was actually the Solway - there is a hamlet of Moricambe there
 
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Mikey C

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Locations within most of London are referred to by the nearest Tube station. I admit some of those were named after pre-existing settlements, but a lot are named after other local features that wouldn't have been very useful for navigation until the Tube appeared.
The area around Finchley Road station (the LU one and the previous Midland one) became known as Finchley Road after the station.
 

Mcr Warrior

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The area around Finchley Road station (the LU one and the previous Midland one) became known as Finchley Road after the station.
Surely this area of Hampstead is effectively named after the turnpike roadway, Finchley Road (formerly known as Finchley New Road), built in the late 1820's and so which predates the somewhat later railway station.
 

steamybrian

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Whilst in London ... a mention for Clapham Junction
The station was built in Battersea but the locals did not like the name Battersea Junction.
The area around the station is known as Clapham Junction.
 

Sm5

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Belmont (originally named California after the pub, but renamed as freight/baggage was being diverted a rather long way from the intended station)…

Wallington is another, it was originally built as Carshalton.
 

Mcr Warrior

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Whilst in London ... a mention for Clapham Junction
The station was built in Battersea but the locals did not like the name Battersea Junction.
Was this particular station previously ever known as 'Falcon Bridge' before a subsequent makeover?
 

steamybrian

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Was this particular station previously ever known as 'Falcon Bridge' before a subsequent makeover?
The station opened as Clapham Junction and retained its name throughout.
From what I have read when it was built it was surrounded by fields and served as an interchange between the lines to Victoria and Waterloo. Clapham being over a mile away and now more conveniently served by Clapham High Street station...!
 

Mikey C

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Surely this area of Hampstead is effectively named after the turnpike roadway, Finchley Road (formerly known as Finchley New Road), built in the late 1820's and so which predates the somewhat later railway station.
It's a 4.5 mile road, you wouldn't choose to name an "area" after a road that long, unless a station had fixed the name to a specific location on the road.

The later Golders Green station is also on the Finchley Road, at the other end of it
 

thenorthern

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Uphall Station is named after Uphall Station and Livingston Station which is now been absorbed by Deans was named after the former Livingston Station.
 

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