T+W Metro Signal 727

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Scott M

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Hello. :)

I noticed signal 727 (on approach to Heworth platform 1) has a junction indicator, stencil indicator and a shunt signal.

I can understand the feather being to tell you you are diverting onto the platform 2 line (not sure if this is the ‘up’ or ‘down’ line, if indeed metro label their lines as such) and the cats eyes to permit this as a shunt manoeuvre. But I am a bit unsure as to what the stencil route indicator is for? As in, I am not sure what this could display that the feather and cats eyes couldn’t. Does anybody happen to know? One theory I had is that this could just be a relic from pre-metro days.
 
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swt_passenger

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Can’t help with the signal, but the lines are referred to as the “In” and “Out” lines. The “In” line is from St James round the loop and onward to South Shields. The other way from South Shields round the loop to St James is the “Out” line. The Airport branch is therefore “out” towards the airport.

(I suppose it could be thought of as a little bit like the LU circle line‘s inner and outer rails, if that‘s familiar to you.)
 
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So whilst I can't be certain if this is the reason here, in mainline signalling principles (and therefore assuming that T&W metro was similar in it's design in this case) a feather can only be used to indicate a route for a main aspect route, and similarly small stencil indicators are only to be used for subsidiary routes (shunt and/or call-on). So in this case whilst which lights are lit is the main indication of the type of route set (main or call-on) the type of route indication also changes with this to make this even clearer to a driver (or perhaps it could be said the principle exists so that a driver seeing only the route indicator but not the signal itself can't then be mistaken on the class of route that is set).
 

railfan249

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So whilst I can't be certain if this is the reason here, in mainline signalling principles (and therefore assuming that T&W metro was similar in it's design in this case) a feather can only be used to indicate a route for a main aspect route, and similarly small stencil indicators are only to be used for subsidiary routes (shunt and/or call-on). So in this case whilst which lights are lit is the main indication of the type of route set (main or call-on) the type of route indication also changes with this to make this even clearer to a driver (or perhaps it could be said the principle exists so that a driver seeing only the route indicator but not the signal itself can't then be mistaken on the class of route that is set).
This is correct.
 

Comfy

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The route indicator (theatre board) works in conjunction with the position light.
 
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Scott M

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Thank you for the responses. Based on the replies, if I was to hazard a guess, I assume the stencil will probably display a platform number to be used in conjunction with the position light.
 
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