Cryptic clues = station name

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Calthrop

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Upper Tyndrum ? ... no matter if you make an annoying racket beating a tin drum ...
 

Calthrop

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It is related to height but does not include the word (or partial) "high" not anything like "tall", etc.

"Daft department" -- since anything sensible, is eluding me: how about Altrincham? It's pronounced "Altringham"; you can "ring 'em" on the phone as much as you like, but you'll still be at a higher ALT-itude than the rest...
 

perryman

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Thank you but the more clues the better, etc...

Where a straight (and also a mixed-up) fruit can be found adjacent to two little north American locations.
 

perryman

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Clue 1: Where a straight (and also a mixed-up) fruit can be found adjacent to two little north American locations.
Clue 2: Closer to home you could also find a condiment in this place, sort of.
 

Calthrop

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Oh, dear -- just to have something to suggest, I did "eeny, meeny..." between five possible candidates: Saltcoates ??
 

Calthrop

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I have no idea of any "whys" re this one: so, going alphabetically -- Saltaire?
 

Calthrop

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@perryman: sorry -- misunderstood your post # 11,026. I'd seem, for an answer, to be reduced to that sweet little Scottish coastal place called Eyehaven Tacklew -- invented by a one-time stalwart of this game !
 

perryman

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Clue 1: Where a straight (and also a mixed-up) fruit can be found adjacent to two little north American locations.
Clue 2: Closer to home you could also find a condiment in this place, sort of.
Clue 3: Confused deliverers of fuel who, individually, sound like the answer to clue 2.
 

perryman

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Camelon ?
Indeed it is, well done.

Clue 1: Canada and California (CA) were the 'little North American locations, with the fruit obviously being 'melon' (or 'lemon, to mix it up).
Clue 2: The condiment of choice is 'Coleman(s)', anagram of which is Camelon.
Clue 3: 'Coalmen', anagram of which etc etc...

@D6130, over to you.
 

D6130

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Thanks. Here's a rather obscure one for which I shall gradually give clues if required:

The row from which a Tyke might watch the flank of a 'spamcan' being painted in fifty shades of undercoat.
 

Calthrop

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As ever -- this is not going to be right, but just to submit something -- Grays.
 

Calthrop

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Nobody else biting at the moment -- no great need seen, to fear "spoilers": so Tyke presumably = Yorkshire; and I'm helped not in the slightest <D.
 

D6130

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Sorry, it's a bit of a begger, as they say here in Yorkshire! It's a double-whammy.....a cryptic anagram!

It's a former junction between a double track main line and a double track branch line.....and had a busy steam locomotive depot until the mid-'sixties.
 
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Barnsley? It's in Yorkshire, a row is a Barney in rhyming slang, L Is fifty in Roman numerals, and S could at a stretch be seen as the flank, or side, of the term spamcan, whatever (other than a container of processed meat) that might be.
 

Calthrop

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"Far-fetched and far-fetcheder" -- I suspect that the setter is cunningly putting us off the scent, by implying that "Tyke" denotes Yorkshire. "Tyke" sometimes colloquially and affectionately refers to a child. I submit Kidsgrove. Kid = child - tyke. "s" -- as per @John Griffiths above. "ro" is nearly "row", in the "line-up", not the "quarrel", sense (it rhymes). The "g" and the "ve" before and after, contribute to fifty shades of grey, total indicating "undercoat": "g" being initial letter of "grey"; and "ve" alluding to Victory in Europe Day, 1945 -- forty-five is nearly fifty :smile: . Easy !
 

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