Mispronounced station names

Mcr Warrior

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How about Camelon (near Falkirk)?

Have heard both Camel-on, and (more usually) Came-lon.
 
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RailUK Forums

Class800

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Came-uh-lun with 3 syllables - I have heard Came-lun but I think that's the lazy version, rather like Edinburgh being said as Edin-bruh instead of Edin-buh-uh ;)
I would agree, but my 3 years in Scotland were in Aberdeen, so not that relevant. The fine details of the syllable may vary.
 

prod_pep

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I've not heard it on train announcements, but one southern pronunciation that gets up my nose is 'Donc[schwah]ster'. Oddly they don't say 'Newc'sle' but Newcahstle which is annoying in a different way. But even most northerners stress the first syllable rather than the authentic second.
I pronounce both Doncaster and Lancaster like that so it isn't merely a Southern England thing, although I feel the 'schwa' pronunciation is perhaps considered posher. The use of 'schwa' here goes back generations and it certainly isn't in any way incorrect; I've heard locals pronounce Lancaster as such.
 

urbophile

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I pronounce both Doncaster and Lancaster like that so it isn't merely a Southern England thing, although I feel the 'schwa' pronunciation is perhaps considered posher. The use of 'schwa' here goes back generations and it certainly isn't in any way incorrect; I've heard locals pronounce Lancaster as such.
No such thing as 'incorrect'! Still gets up my nose though.
 

snowball

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I was brought up near Manchester. When I moved to Leeds I was surprised to find that a lot of Yorkshire people pronunce certain A's with a southernish "ah" sound, such as "mahster" and "plahster", while using flat Northern A's like my own in lots of other words, such as "faster".
 

matchmaker

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Came-uh-lun with 3 syllables - I have heard Came-lun but I think that's the lazy version, rather like Edinburgh being said as Edin-bruh instead of Edin-buh-uh ;)
As seen on a local website a few years ago - "Two syllables is local, three is over annunciated posh!" :lol:
 

vic-rijrode

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My Grandfather, from just north of Hemel and a great railway enthusiast, obviously missed the Great Vowel Shift as he pronounced Hertford (as in North or East) and Derby (as in Midland and Friargate) as they are spelled.
 

hexagon789

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My Grandfather, from just north of Hemel and a great railway enthusiast, obviously missed the Great Vowel Shift as he pronounced Hertford (as in North or East) and Derby (as in Midland and Friargate) as they are spelled.
Not sure about Hertford, but Derby was commonly spelled Darbye in the 17th century during the latter period of the Great Vowel Shift after the spelling reforms of the 16th century.
 

Pinza-C55

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In the North East Region when I was on the Tyne & Wear Metro back in September, I have heard Pelaw being pronounced "Pee-lore" onboard the train, but I heard a lady passenger who boarded asking if it calls there with her pronunciation being "Pellow" (like Marti Pellow who is/was the frontman for the Clydebank quartet Wet Wet Wet).

Which pronunciation is right, or are both correct depending on which side of Tyne the locals are from?

I'm from the area and never heard it pronounced as anything other than Pee-Lore.

The first time I went to Grosmont for the NYMR I asked the guard for a ticket to Groz-mont. He probably had a chuckle with the driver about it.
 

D869

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Halling
Conwy

P.S. Good job there's no Research station (of the railway variety).
 

hermit

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The recorded on-train announcements on the Victoria Line refer to War-ren Street, as in WAR, rather than rhyming with foreign.
 

Clansman

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Weems, in much the same way that Glamis is Glahms.

And Leuchars is as in the drink, Leucharzade.
Is the 'ch' in Leuchars not pronounced the same as the 'ch' in loch? The auto announcements pronounce it that way, but everyone else I know seems to pronounced the 'ch' as a hard 'K'.
 

oldman

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Is the 'ch' in Leuchars not pronounced the same as the 'ch' in loch? The auto announcements pronounce it that way, but everyone else I know seems to pronounced the 'ch' as a hard 'K'.
I suspect many people in Scotland would assume it is phonetic X (= 'ch' as in loch), and that K is an error - like saying Lock Lomond. For example, the academic Robert McColl Millar in Modern Scots: an analytical survey regards X as the natural pronunciation:

It is my experience that most customer service people ... on the train ... announce that we are approaching /ˈlukərz/ ... rather than /ˈluxərz/, as I would naturally pronounce it.

He suggests Irish influence via Glasgow as causing the K pronunciation to spread, though it conflicts with 'correct' Scottish pronunciation. Recorded announcements will tend to follow the 'correct' pronunciation; live 'customer services people' may not.
 

D6130

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I suspect many people in Scotland would assume it is phonetic X (= 'ch' as in loch), and that K is an error - like saying Lock Lomond. For example, the academic Robert McColl Millar in Modern Scots: an analytical survey regards X as the natural pronunciation:



He suggests Irish influence via Glasgow as causing the K pronunciation to spread, though it conflicts with 'correct' Scottish pronunciation. Recorded announcements will tend to follow the 'correct' pronunciation; live 'customer services people' may not.
Most, if not all, Irish people of my acquaintance, pronounce 'Lough' - the Irish equivalent of the Scottish 'Loch' - in exactly the same way as the Scots do.
 

hexagon789

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Is the 'ch' in Leuchars not pronounced the same as the 'ch' in loch? The auto announcements pronounce it that way, but everyone else I know seems to pronounced the 'ch' as a hard 'K'.
Both pronunciations are given, but with the guttural 'kh' variant leading - which is the one I would use.

I'm not surprised a hard 'k' variant is now treated as a legitimate alternative, in my experience few people my age and slightly older pronounce 'ch' as a guttural, aspirated 'kh' rather than a hard 'k' anymore - ie making lock and loch homophones.
 

Mikey C

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The recorded on-train announcements on the Victoria Line refer to War-ren Street, as in WAR, rather than rhyming with foreign.
That confuses me as well

I don't remember the Northern Line announcements being pronounced that way, I'm sure they say "warren", as in the rabbit home!
 

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