Jeremy Corbyn suspended from Labour Party (now reinstated) and whip removed

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DynamicSpirit

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I see Len McCluskey, as usual, has an insightful, and completely understated, take on events :lol:

LenMcCluskey said:
The continued persecution of Jeremy Corbyn, a politician who inspired millions, by a leadership capitulating to external pressure on Party procedures risks destroying the unity and integrity of the Party.

(Tweet, my bold)

And a quick look around Twitter shows that he's not the only one on the left using that language.

Last time I checked, persecution meant things like, having all your family killed, or being 'disappeared' into a secret prison and repeatedly tortured, or having your home destroyed and being forced to flee, etc. I never knew that the sheer awfulness having to sit as an independent MP, keeping all your MP's privileges except for not having the the party whip, could cause such intense suffering as to amount to 'persecution'!
 
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Journeyman

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I see Len McCluskey, as usual, has an insightful, and completely understated, take on events :lol:



(Tweet, my bold)

And a quick look around Twitter shows that he's not the only one on the left using that language.

Last time I checked, persecution meant things like, having all your family killed, or being 'disappeared' into a secret prison and repeatedly tortured, or having your home destroyed and being forced to flee, etc. I never knew that the sheer awfulness having to sit as an independent MP, keeping all your MP's privileges except for not having the the party whip, could cause such intense suffering as to amount to 'persecution'!

Yeah. I'm just thinking about people that might know something about real persecution, like people that lost everything, were herded into prison camps and murdered, like...err...let's see...Jews.

A lot of the shadowy "politicians" Corbyn associated with are just as dedicated to persecuting Jews as the Nazis were.
 

Journeyman

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Good - all the cranks leave and get destroyed at the next elections. That is why he wont do it. He wont risk his cushy £71k a year for doing nothing of any constructive value. Oh except "winning the argument"....................
Yeah. All he's done recently is undermine Labour and side with the Tories on multiple occasions. He may have been a good backbench MP, and is no doubt popular for looking after his constituents, but as a leader he was absolutely useless and actually quite dangerous. It's no surprise he never held a cabinet or shadow cabinet position, he doesn't have a clue.
 

Logan Carroll

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I wish he would. All of the extremist troublemakers would join him, and leave Labour to the grownups.
Every party is just children playing politics, doesn’t matter if its Labour or the Tories.

I remember reading about an incident during the 70s when Labour won a vote on the creation of British Airways by questionable means (Two MPs had an agreement that their vote would cancel out eachother so they both would not show up, however the labour MP did turn up without telling the torie and the vote was won by a single vote).

This culminated in a fight in parliament where someone picked up a mace and was swinging it about (cannot remember who or why there was a mace knocking about).
 

JamesT

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Every party is just children playing politics, doesn’t matter if its Labour or the Tories.

I remember reading about an incident during the 70s when Labour won a vote on the creation of British Airways by questionable means (Two MPs had an agreement that their vote would cancel out eachother so they both would not show up, however the labour MP did turn up without telling the torie and the vote was won by a single vote).

This culminated in a fight in parliament where someone picked up a mace and was swinging it about (cannot remember who or why there was a mace knocking about).
Michael Heseltine was famously the person who picked up the mace and swung it around.

The mace is there on the table between the two front benches as a symbol of the Crown. Parliament cannot operate lawfully without it and it’s placed there at the start of each day.

He hasn't been expelled from Parliament. He is still an MP.

This is a bit of a funny one as he’s merely had the whip removed and there is still the chance he might get it back.

There certainly have been calls for automatic by-elections to be called when MPs decide to switch party between elections. I know in our system an election is for an individual, but many people will vote for a candidate solely based on the party they represent. If the basis that someone was elected on no longer holds, wouldn’t it be best to ask the electorate if they still want them?
 
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Xenophon PCDGS

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Michael Heseltine was famously the person who picked up the mace and swung it around.

The mace is there on the table between the two front benches as a symbol of the Crown. Parliament cannot operate lawfully without it and it’s placed there at the start of each day.
There were two other instances this century of a Member of Parliament laying hands upon the ceremonial mace during heated exchanges in House of Commons debates that led to their suspension by the Speaker. Both were Labour Party members of the House of Commons:-

2009 ... John McDonnell

2018 .. Lloyd Russell-Moyle
 

DarloRich

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There certainly have been calls for automatic by-elections to be called when MPs decide to switch party between elections. I know in our system an election is for an individual, but many people will vote for a candidate solely based on the party they represent. If the basis that someone was elected on no longer holds, wouldn’t it be best to ask the electorate if they still want them?


Well he hasn't chosen to leave the Labour Party. They chose to leave him!
 

43096

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I see Len McCluskey, as usual, has an insightful, and completely understated, take on events :lol:



(Tweet, my bold)

And a quick look around Twitter shows that he's not the only one on the left using that language.

Last time I checked, persecution meant things like, having all your family killed, or being 'disappeared' into a secret prison and repeatedly tortured, or having your home destroyed and being forced to flee, etc. I never knew that the sheer awfulness having to sit as an independent MP, keeping all your MP's privileges except for not having the the party whip, could cause such intense suffering as to amount to 'persecution'!
All very predictable that the usual rent-a-mob are backing "Saint Jeremy".

This article (on the Guardian website, not noted as a Tory paper!) about Corbyn seems pretty bang on to me:

I won't quote it in full as it is fairly lengthy. I will, though, quote the concluding paragraph as a representation of the message:
Those who can’t see this now have the story of betrayal that they have been yearning for. Poor old St Jeremy, they cry, victim of the brutal Keir Starmer, martyred for the satisfaction of the anti-Corbyn media. Spare your tears. The victim of this hideous chapter in Labour’s history is not Jeremy Corbyn. The victims are those who were scared and scarred by the vile antisemitism that occurred when he was in charge. The victims are all those who needed an electable challenger to the Tories, not the toxic and sectarian party that Labour became under Mr Corbyn. The victims are the many millions of people who depend on having a Labour party capable of commanding the confidence of the public so that it can effectively represent those it exists to champion. Jeremy Corbyn is no martyr. He is a victim only of his own arrogantly self-pitying, self-denying delusions.
 

PHILIPE

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Keir Starmer is merely trying to make the Labour Party electable again but those he is cracking down on can see no further than their own ideology.
 

brad465

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Keir Starmer is merely trying to make the Labour Party electable again but those he is cracking down on can see no further than their own ideology.
It's not just this, it's that they see Corbyn as the best person to lead that ideology but don't accept that leaders come and go, a fact that applies to all political parties of all points on the political spectrum, and they need to move on. Even if they maintained there ideology, but with a different figure fronting it, the whole situation would be better than it is now.

Corbyn actually resigned as leader on his own accord (i.e. he didn't suffer to the actions of 2016 on him), but those loyal to him still focus on what they see as good in him and his past, when really they need to think forward to the future.

I am wondering if Corbyn announced in the leadup to the 2024 election (most likely date) that he wasn't seeking re-election, it would be the biggest boost to the party's general election campaign above any other manifesto pledges. He'd be nearly 75 by this point so it's not beyond the bounds, but wouldn't be surprised if he doesn't step down.
 

ABB125

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I am wondering if Corbyn announced in the leadup to the 2024 election (most likely date) that he wasn't seeking re-election, it would be the biggest boost to the party's general election campaign above any other manifesto pledges. He'd be nearly 75 by this point so it's not beyond the bounds, but wouldn't be surprised if he doesn't step down.
What do you mean!? That would be the biggest disaster in the history of the Labour party! Honestly, some of the suggestions these days...

:D:D:D
 

brad465

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What do you mean!? That would be the biggest disaster in the history of the Labour party! Honestly, some of the suggestions these days...

:D:D:D
Forgive me for being naïve but are you being sarcastic or was I genuinely stating something silly? (It's not easy to tell online)

Either way he'll be going at some point, whether it's through standing down or through eventual death (not advocating he dies I'm just stating this natural phase of life to clear things up, even then I bet some Corbyn die-hards would demand he rule from the grave)
 

ABB125

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Forgive me for being naïve but are you being sarcastic or was I genuinely stating something silly? (It's not easy to tell online)

Either way he'll be going at some point, whether it's through standing down or through eventual death (not advocating he dies I'm just stating this natural phase of life to clear things up, even then I bet some Corbyn die-hards would demand he rule from the grave)
Sarcastic. I tried to find an eye-rolling face, but couldn't.
Although I imagine there will be some people who genuinely believe what I wrote!
 

daodao

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Former leaders of parties fade away, so Corbyn's comments after the ECHR report was published should have been ignored. Suspending and then partially reinstating him has been counter-productive. Corbyn is a decent man, if occasionally misguided and not particularly bright, and the whole furore casts Starmer in an unnecessarily unfavourable light.
 

Darandio

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Former leaders of parties fade away, so Corbyn's comments after the ECHR report was published should have been ignored. Suspending and then partially reinstating him has been counter-productive. Corbyn is a decent man, if occasionally misguided and not particularly bright, and the whole furore casts Starmer in an unnecessarily unfavourable light.

They should have ignored him doubling down on his comments and saying the report was overstated and he wasn't part of the problem? What about the lack of apology, ignore that too? Cloud cuckoo land.

Sounds like a thoroughly decent bloke.
 

43096

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Former leaders of parties fade away, so Corbyn's comments after the ECHR report was published should have been ignored. Suspending and then partially reinstating him has been counter-productive. Corbyn is a decent man, if occasionally misguided and not particularly bright, and the whole furore casts Starmer in an unnecessarily unfavourable light.
Corbyn is not a decent man, as his behaviour throughout this shows.

Starmer is showing some leadership, where the NEC failed.
 

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